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continuing rarities south san diego county 2-6-21

continuing rarities south san diego county 2-6-21
By – 7:28 am
Just a follow-up to Paul’s post in case more specific directions may help:Elizabeth Copper, two other birders (sorry I missed your names!), and I refound the Pine Warbler and Hermit Warbler in the NE corner of Friendship Park in Chula Vista early morning on 6 Feb 2021, but only after a prolonged period of repeatedly searching throughout the northern half of the park (although the hermit had been seen briefly earlier in the WNW portion of the park).  (The last report I’d seen on eBird referenced the birds being in the NW portion of the park).  They were initially seen in the NE most pines then moved south and eventually to the large magnolia (or fig?) just north of the parking lot.  We were surprised to see a Black Phoebe aggressively chasing the Pine Warbler at times.  Multiple Townsend’s Warblers were also present throughout the north half of the park.Elizabeth and I refound the Tennessee Warbler in central Montgomery-Waller Park in Otay Mesa in the previously reported row of eucalyptus extending south from the restroom building.  It was very skulky, staying silent, still, and well-hidden for long periods, then being active and vocal before going quiet again.  Rather than being near the restroom building, it was at the opposite (south) end of the row of trees, in the 2nd and 3rd eucalyptus from the south end (immediately NE of the SE corner of the western ballfield).  Closest parking is along the east edge of the park south from Palm Ave.At Sunnyslope Park in Otay Mesa, we had the continuing Western Tanager and female Bullock’s Oriole in the flowering eucalyptus adjacent to the ENE corner of the basketball court (oriole also seen briefly by another birder, sorry I missed your name).  The oriole flew NNW out of the park to a dead acacia in a private yard.  We also had frustratingly brief and incomplete views (head, tail, breast & wing) of what appeared to possibly be a female Orchard Oriole, but were unable to confirm an ID (but it clearly was not the previously reported juv male).  Although sapsucker wells were visible in multiple eucs, we were unable to refind the previously reported Red-naped Sapsucker.At the Tijuana River Valley Bird & Butterfly Garden, the only rarity we refound was a male Wilson’s Warbler foraging along the slope between the trail and river just off the NW corner of the park building.  (And yes, the river reeks from recent sewage spills).Robert PattonSan Diego, CA