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Monthly Archives: February 2024

Tierrasanta Hepatic and other miscellanea

8:46 am

The returning male Hepatic Tanager continues sporadically in Tierrasanta but I have yet to be able to find where it is roosting, thus no public viewing session has yet to be arranged. But I’ll keep trying. The two Greater White-fronted Geese continue on the northeast pond on nearby Admiral Baker Golf Course. A splotchy male Summer Tanager continues at Via del Norte Park in southern La Jolla. An adult dark-lored White-crowned Sparrow was in central Balboa park yesterday between the Fleet Science Center and the Pepper Grove Picnic Area, with a total of 6 Western Tanagers elsewhere nearby. And Patton and Copper report the continuing Chestnut-sided Warbler yesterday around the small catchment basin at the Las Americas Mall parking lot in San Ysidro.
Paul Lehman, San Diego

Northern ParulaS and Sandhill Crane

6:42 am

Previous email sent out prematurely, sorry.

I believe there are two different ones in the two different areas that people have seen them and I do not think they are the same birds. The first one that was seen over by the chicken coop is lighter gray overall. Has a lighter chestnut breast patch and no rust smudge near the shoulder. Has no white extending from eyering to bill but instead very dark feathers from eyering to bill. Also appears to have more of a green crown. Whereas the other darker gray bird that is seen further down by the green foot bridge, has a deeper darker chestnut breast patch with a smudge of chestnut on the left side of the breast. It also has white extending from the eyering to the bill. And the crown looks gray. 

If you go looking for them, please specify which one you are reporting for the reviewers and where you found it. 

Sandhill Crane>the bird moves around in the field and is EASILY overlooked. Blends in and crouches low in the weeds. 

Sally Veach-O’side


Northern ParulaS and Sandhill Crane in Oside

6:31 am





Details

 I believe there are two different ones in the two different areas that people have seen them and I do not think they are the same birds. The first one that was seen over by the chicken coop is lighter gray overall. Has a lighter chestnut breast patch and no rust smudge near the shoulder. Has no white extending from eyering to bill but instead very dark feathers from eyering to bill. Also appears to have more of a green crown. Whereas the other darker gray bird that is seen further down by the green foot bridge, has a deeper darker chestnut breast patch with a smudge of chestnut on the left side of the breast. It also has white extending from the eyering to the bill. And the crown looks gray.

Details I believe there are two different ones in the two different areas that people have seen them and I do not think they are the same birds. The first one that was seen over by the chicken coop is lighter gray overall. Has a lighter chestnut breast patch and no rust smudge near the shoulder. Has no white extending from eyering to bill but instead very dark feathers from eyering to bill. Also appears to have more of a green crown. Whereas the other darker gray bird that is seen further down by the green foot bridge, has a deeper darker chestnut breast patch with a smudge of chestnut on the left side of the breast. It also has white extending from the eyering to the bill. And the crown looks gray.

Sandhill Crane. The bird moves around, blends in, sits low sometimes and can be easily overlooked.

DetailsI believe there are two different ones in the two different areas that people have seen them and I do not think they are the same birds. The first one that was seen over by the chicken coop is lighter gray overall. Has a lighter chestnut breast patch and no rust smudge near the shoulder. Has no white extending from eyering to bill but instead very dark feathers from eyering to bill. Also appears to have more of a green crown. Whereas the other darker gray bird that is seen further down by the green foot bridge, has a deeper darker chestnut breast patch with a smudge of chestnut on the left side of the breast. It also has white extending from the eyering to the bill. And the crown looks gray. 

A suggested method of finding Scott’s Orioles at this time of year.

6:40 pm

Hi, All,

I was hiking and birding in Anza Borrego yesterday, and at Mountain Palm Springs the native fan palms were fruiting abundantly.  In both the large groves at this site, I found a male Scott’s Oriole apparently feeding on the fruit.  I’m not sure they actually were, as none of my photos seem to capture either one (couldn’t get shots of the 2nd bird) with a berry in the bill.  Perhaps they were interested in a bug that was interested in the fruit, but again, can’t tell.  Anyhow, it seems a good moment to look for them in stands of Washingtonia filifera.  You might hear them first, as I did, singing more cleanly and melodically than our other orioles.  Below is my check list with photos.  One is a fairly sharp photo of the oriole standing on the fruit, and the other, slightly less sharp ones, are of the oriole not quite actually eating the fruit.

Mountain Palm Springs checklist

Cheers,  Tuck Russell
Hillcrest

Glaucous gull

11:58 am

Currently in leftmost channel from the viewing platform west of 10th street at Bayshore Bikeway

Stan Walens, San Diego
February 26, 2024; 11:50 am

SD Bird Festival Sunday Pelagic: LAYSAN ALBATROSS

4:14 pm

The
San Diego Bird Festival Sunday pelagic trip aboard “New Seaforth” out
to the Nine-Mile Bank area was blessed with almost smooth seas. The grand highlight was certainly the Laysan Albatross which flew in to the boat @ 32.6033, -117.4689, some 13.7 miles WSW of the tip of Point Loma, right at the very outer edge of the Nine-Mile Bank. We had it at our feet for half an hour, with plenty of selfies even taken of it with cellphones. Good numbers of alcids for the day. Species
seen once we were a mile or so offshore were as follows:
Surf Scoter  14
Pomarine Jaeger  5
Parasitic Jaeger  4
jaeger sp.  5
Common Murre  18
Scripps’s Murrelet  46
Cassin’s Auklet  15
Rhinoceros Auklet  100
Bonaparte’s Gull  450
Heermann’s Gull  19
Western Gull  250
California Gull  27
Herring Gull  2
Glaucous-winged Gull  1
Royal Tern  4
Pacific Loon  1
LAYSAN ALBATROSS  1
Pink-footed Shearwater  1
Sooty Shearwater  2
Black-vented Shearwater  1000
Brown Booby  3
Brandt’s Cormorant  150
Brown Pelican  45
hummingbird sp.  1
Also: Black Oystercatcher 1, Surfbird 36, Black Turnstone 7, Fin Whale 1
–Paul Lehman, Dave Povey, Bruce Rideout, Nancy Christensen, Peter Ginsburg, Dan Jehl, Stan Walens, San Diego

Negative report – no rare Gulls this afternoon at J Street

6:33 pm

A varying number of birders spent from around noon until 4:00 p.m. at J
Street today hoping to find the rare Gulls (the Glaucous in particular)
that were reported yesterday. No luck on any of them. No Glaucous, no
Iceland, no Lesser Black-backed. There were multiple Herring and
Glaucous-winged. Doubt the rarities were there and missed with multiple
birders with scopes repeatedly scanning through the large number of Gulls.

Lisa Ruby
Sabre Springs


Lisa Ruby
Sabre Springs

SD Bird Festival Saturday pelagic trip

4:28 pm

The San Diego Bird Festival Saturday pelagic trip aboard “New Seaforth” out to the Nine-Mile Banks area was blessed with almost smooth seas. An American X Black Oystercatcher was on the Mission Bay jetties. Species seen once a mile or so offshore were as follows:
Eared Grebe  1
Pomarine Jaeger  2
Parasitic Jaeger  3
Common Murre  6
Scripps’s Murrelet  14
Cassin’s Auklet  5
Rhinoceros Auklet  20
Bonaparte’s Gull  125
Heermann’s Gull  18
Western Gull  150
California Gull  11
Glaucous-winged Gull  1
Forster’s Tern  1
Royal Tern  2
Elegant Tern  1
Pacific Loon  2
Black-vented Shearwater  470
Brown Booby  4
Brandt’s Cormorant  130
Brown Pelican  35
Also: American X Black Oystercatcher 1, Surfbird 40, Black Turnstone 6, Gray Whale 4, Minke Whale 1
–Paul Lehman, Dave Povey, Bruce Rideout, Tom Blackman, Nancy Christensen, Peter Ginsburg, San Diego