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Monthly Archives: August 2022

Re: Breeding Plumage Scarlet Tanager still being seen 7pm

Re: Breeding Plumage Scarlet Tanager still being seen 7pm
By – 8:11 pm
Mark, Thanks for sharing your link and photo. While Peter Pyle’s input would be invaluable, I get the impression that this bird is in its second year and is currently molting. As prebasic molt in this species occurs on the summer grounds (Pyle 1997), the evidence suggests that it summered in the area.Jim PikeHB 

Breeding Plumage Scarlet Tanager still being seen 7pm

Breeding Plumage Scarlet Tanager still being seen 7pm
By – 7:04 pm
Good evening,I went down on a stakeout at 3:30 to look for the Scarlet Tanager.  The bird showed at 4:19 and again at 5:37 at the fountain described by Paul Lehman in a Previous e-mail.  Both times the bird flew up in a Euc to the right of the picnic table, when you are looking at the fountain.  I believe it is West.  The bird was in view until I left at 6:15 and was still in view close to 7 when I spoke to Kris McMillan.  See photo on my 1 bird checklist.https://ebird.org/checklist/S116185971Mark StrattonNorth Park

SCARLET TANAGER – YES 6:00 PM

SCARLET TANAGER – YES 6:00 PM
By – 6:05 pm
The Scarlet Tanager is showing very well presently, it came in to drink at 5:37 PM again and is still in view in the neighboring Eucalyptus as of 6:00 PM.Nathan GoldbergNorth Park

Scarlet Tanager continues

Scarlet Tanager continues
By – 4:43 pm
Today, Monday afternoon, Mark Stratton photographed the adult male scarlet tanager returning to drink at the leaky drinking fountain as described in my earlier post today, at Morley Field. He had it between 4:15 and 4:20, but it only stayed about half a minute. It then flew up into the eucalyptus trees immediately to the northwest of the fountain. When originally photographed 8 days ago, it was photoed at about 5:15 p.m. and today we were there for 3 hours starting at dawn and had no luck. So it certainly appears that late afternoon is the time to try. Please give the fountain adequate space so birds can come into it.Paul Lehman, San DiegoSent from the all new AOL app for Android

Scarlet Tanager – YES!!

Scarlet Tanager – YES!!
By – 4:32 pm
Mark Stratton just sent me photos of the male Scarlet Tanager that Paul posted about this morning. The bird came to the drinking fountain at 4:19. This is at Morley Field, near the dugout of the NE baseball field near the bathrooms snd playground. Reporting as requested by Mark StrattonNancy ChristensenRamonaA bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.Chinese Proverb

SCARLET Tanager photo, ANOTHER Mexican Duck?, miscellanea

SCARLET Tanager photo, ANOTHER Mexican Duck?, miscellanea
By – 11:12 am

Yesterday, 31 July, Mark Stratton ran into a couple folks at Morley Field in n. Balboa Park who showed him a photo of an alternate male Scarlet Tanager drinking at a leaky drinking fountain there and reportedly taken a week earlier, on 24 July. We obtained a copy of the photo, and with a bit of Google Earth sleuthing by Justyn, determined that indeed said exact drinking fountain is located there at the northeastern ballfield backstop at 32.73830, -117.13882. A number of us went there this morning (Monday) and had no luck re-finding the bird, but plenty of birds were going to drink at that fountain once it warmed up. There are exceptionally few summer records after June of Scarlet Tanagers in the state….In fact, there may be no more than about three records ever for July and early August, all of which also involve adult males. Given the exceptional nature of this record, we are still trying to confirm the 24 July date, especially given that the photo was passed through two levels of non-birders to reach us. If the bird was indeed there just a week ago, it may well remain in the general area for still some time, given that typically Scarlet Tanagers molt into basic plumage before migrating south, and this bird didn’t appear to have yet molted a single feather. But it is a bit of a needle in a haystack, as there is really no one especially attractive area for the bird there.

When I went to see the Mexican Duck early on 30 July at Lower Otay Lake, I also saw a female duck that also showed characters of Mexican Duck in the group of Mallards closest to you from where one stands to look for the male. Photos of the female (note bill color pattern) were then taken by Justyn who included them in his eBird report that day of Mallard/Mexican Duck. But given the ID difficulties, none of us felt overly confident of what it was. Since then, however, an expert at Mexican Duck ID has chimed in that he believes it could well be that species. Anyway, if one goes there looking for the male, be also on the lookout (and get more photos) of the female bird in question, which was in the group of Mallards closer to where one stands.

In other news, I went to outer Point Loma early yesterday, 31 July, to look for early fall landbird migrants, and was indeed “rewarded” with a Western Kingbird, Ash-throated Flycatcher, and Black-headed Grosbeak–all fairly regular migrants already in latter July. On the 30th, there was still a summering Ring-necked Duck, American Wigeon, and 3 Wood Ducks on Lower Otay Lake, plus multiple Least Bitterns; and on 29 July there was a continuing summering Ring-necked Duck at Lake #5 at Santee Lakes, whereas the infamous male scaup continued on Lake #4, looking actually a bit more Lesser-like than it had in the past….!!

–Paul Lehman, San Diego

 

North American Birds – Spring 2022

North American Birds – Spring 2022
By – 6:27 am
County Coordinators/Contributors:The Spring Migration Season (1 March 2022 through 31 May 2022) is ended, and we solicit reports for inclusion in the Southern California Region of NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS. Reports should be arranged with species in the taxonomic order followed by the American Ornithologists Union (Check-List of North American Birds 1998 and all Supplements) and the American Birding Association (7th edition of the ABA Checklist, 2009 revised through the 28th Report). Reports of species included on the California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) review list http://www.californiabirds.orgmust be accompanied by documentation (written description, photographs, etc.).Similar documentation should also accompany reports of species unusual forthe location or season. Full names, with all initials, should be used in thereports – John P. Doe in lieu of John Doe.Reports should be sent to the appropriate County Coordinators (listed below)or directly to Guy McCaskie, on or before 22 August 2022. NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS cannot exist without your input.David Compton (Santa Barbara County)davcompton60@…  Tom M. Edell (San Luis Obispo County)tedell@…  Kimball L. Garrett (Los Angeles County)cyanolyca818@…  David Rankin (Riverside County)david.rankin@… Kelli Heindel-Levinsonkkheindel@… Chris and Rosie Howard (Inyo County)chris93514@… Adam Searcy (Ventura County)serpophaga@…Alexander E. Koonce (San Bernardino County)sandy_koonce@…  Guy McCaskie (San Diego and Imperial County)guymcc@…  Ryan S. Winkleman (Orange County)rswinkleman@…  We thank you in advance for your time and effort.Guy McCaskie and Kimball L. Garrett..