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Monthly Archives: July 2022

San Diego Pelagic – Nazca & Red-footed Boobies, Craveri’s M, Wilson’s SP, July 10, 2022

San Diego Pelagic – Nazca & Red-footed Boobies, Craveri’s M, Wilson’s SP, July 10, 2022

By – 11:30 am
Several of us ventured offshore San Diego yesterday July 10, 2022 in search of birds.  Sea conditions were fairly unpleasant because of the close west swell interval but we continued anyways eventually making it out to The Corner.  After the time consuming west travel not much deviation made on a straight east return skirting along the US-MX line just to our south.  77 NM traveled in total.Early in the morning, before reaching the Nine Mile Bank, we located a large concentration of birds feeding around fast moving Common Dolphin.  Hundreds of shearwaters milling around, expected species only.  We quickly found a near adult NAZCA BOOBY overhead, it eventually sat on the water for some great photos.Just a short while later, continuing to the lower Nine Mile Bank, we were treated to a close passing RED-FOOTED BOOBY on a beeline south-to-north.We continued a slow grind west across the San Diego Trough to the Thirty Mile Bank.  One CRAVERI’S MURRELET encountered along the way.  Conditions improved a bit so we eventually pressed on to near The Corner.  In spite of stopping here for considerable time, running out fish oil slicks and chum, attracting a fair number of Black and a couple Ashy Storm-Petrels, there was no sign for us today of Cook’s Petrels.  But we did spot a second NAZCA BOOBY, looked to be a clean adult, headed east-to-west south of our position.  Photos show a white back unlike the first bird earlier in the day.We had only gone a few miles on our return east when a small black-and-white storm-petrel caught our attention near to the boat – WILSON’S STORM-PETREL!  A close look at photos shows feet consistently projecting beyond a shorter almost unnotched tail, more narrow belt like white rump (less extensive than expected on Townsend’s Storm-Petrel), very large white offset patches on the undersides, and upperwing pale bar pronounced on the secondary coverts, which are almost white tipped on the ends.Also at The Corner several of us saw a hummingbird come zipping close by the boat.  I think it was headed northeast.  Not sure on identification.  Fingers crossed it made it to terra firma.– Gary NunnPacific Beach

Re: Del Mar birds of interest (and ID question – photo quiz)

Re: Del Mar birds of interest (and ID question – photo quiz)
By – 6:50 pm
On 7/10/2022 1:25 PM, David Trissel wrote:It is VERY slow out there. Thought I’d entice some folks with a photo quiz.While doing the San Dieguito monthly bird survey, JoAnne Kellogg and I found the only interesting species, the continuing Neotropic Cormorant on the wires at 7:00 this morning with 9 Double-crested Cormorants.Photo quiz: In addition, we had a bluebird that we initially assumed was an immature Western Bluebird. I’m curious if anyone can point to specific field marks that distinguish Western from Mountain in immature birds. The checklist with photos is here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S114790391I’m no expert on immature bluebirds, but a cursory glance at Sibley indicates that Mountain Bluebirds have slightly longer wings than the other two species. Looking at your photographs and comparing them with Sibley’s illustrations, it would appear to me that the bird in the photo is a Western Bluebird. However, an immature bird might not have fully-grown primaries, so I wouldn’t place much confidence in this conclusion.John WaltersBonita, CAjohnfwalters5552@…_._,_._,_

Del Mar birds of interest (and ID question – photo quiz)

Del Mar birds of interest (and ID question – photo quiz)
By – 1:25 pm
It is VERY slow out there. Thought I’d entice some folks with a photo quiz.While doing the San Dieguito monthly bird survey, JoAnne Kellogg and I found the only interesting species, the continuing Neotropic Cormorant on the wires at 7:00 this morning with 9 Double-crested Cormorants.Photo quiz: In addition, we had a bluebird that we initially assumed was an immature Western Bluebird. I’m curious if anyone can point to specific field marks that distinguish Western from Mountain in immature birds. The checklist with photos is here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S114790391Thank you in advance for any feedback.Sincerely,David TrisselSan Diego, CA

Re: No sighting-request for suggestions

Re: No sighting-request for suggestions
By – 5:28 pm
Hello Everyone, I will be visiting family in San Diego (from St. Louis) for the next two weeks and would love to hear from anyone with advice on the best places to see and photograph shorebirds and waders. I would also love to see skimmers, any of the tern species, western grebes, osprey and reddish egrets and more. I will staying in Point Lomo but don’t mind driving an hour or more around the area. I am also planning on taking a whale watching tour and hope to see some pelagic birds. These are the spots that were of interest to me that I found from past eBird lists for the month of July (and a few other sources) : Chula Vista marina, Cabrillo National Monument, San Elija, Santee Lakes, South San Diego Bay Salt works, several areas around La Jolla, Bolsa Chica lagoon (diving pelicans?). There were several beaches that seemed promising but I read that raw sewage was a problem such as Tijuana Slough but I don’t know if that would be an issue. I know July isn’t the best month for a lot of birds but any suggestions or information would be much appreciated so I can concentrate my attention on the best places. I subscribed to this list last month and have really enjoyed reading all of your reports. Thanks again, Stephanie

Upcoming San Diego Pelagic Birding trips

Upcoming San Diego Pelagic Birding trips
By – 9:58 am
Hello Birders,The next San Diego pelagic birding trip, Saturday July 16th., is currently fully booked and that trip has a waiting list. I say again this is a Saturday trip. We seem to have caused some confusion by alternating trips between the two weekend days.If you are on the waiting list, have not been called, and wish to go. I highly suggest you show up at the Seaforth Landing in Mission Bay, Saturday morning about 6 a.m. ready to go. See me, I regularly have a last minute cancellation or a no show. I will put you on the boat. This is for those on the waiting list only!The next two Buena Vista Audubon sponsored pelagic birding trips aboard the 80ft.  Legacy are; Saturday August 13th. and Sunday, September 11th. These trips are at the peak of San Diego’s fall pelagic migration, and both will fill. Currently each has about a dozen open spots. I suggest, if you’re thinking of going, you book these soon. You can see trip details, and expected species at www.sandiegopelagics.com. ,  you can book directly at www.sdwhale.com., or call Seaforth Landing at 619 224 -3383 during business hours.Good birding, and I hope to see you out there,Dave PoveyDulzura

American White Pelican

American White Pelican
By – 7:09 am
I saw a breeding adult in the San Elijo Lagoon yesterday. I thought it was an unusual sighting, but it didn’t show up on the Rare Bird Alert.https://ebird.org/checklist/S114654315

Craveri’s, NESTING Black & AmericanXBlack Oystercatchers

Craveri’s, NESTING Black & AmericanXBlack Oystercatchers

By – 2:26 pm

Forgot to mention that during our offshore trip today, Friday, we also saw 5 Craveri’s Murrelets at the 30-Mile Bank and about a dozen Cassin’s Auklets. As we motored back in to San Diego Bay, we had a Black and an American X Black Oystercatcher at the mouth of the bay on Zuniga Jetty. This is presumably the long-staying American X Black from nearby Cabrillo National Monument, etc. And also today, we were alerted by Brennan Mulrooney to an iNaturalist report by someone of presumably this same pair of one Black and one American X Black with a young CHICK on the rocks at the tidepools area of Cabrillo N. M. photo’d on 3 July. This establishes the first fully confirmed nesting record of oystercatchers in San Diego County. There had been one or two previous “strongly suggestive” events (e.g., see Atlas).

–Paul Lehman, San Diego

Three Cooks Petrels off San Diego

Three Cooks Petrels off San Diego
By – 12:47 pm
A few folks went offshore this morning, Friday, and had three separate Cooks Petrels out at the 30-mile bank and the corner. Otherwise, 4 dark rumped leach’s storm petrels and about 13 ashies.Paul Lehman, San DiegoSent from the all new AOL app for Android

Thurs. a.m., COTEs still there

Thurs. a.m., COTEs still there
By – 3:51 pm
A group of us birded at the J Street wetlands this morning, and for anyone interested, the small flock (6-8 birds) of Common Terns was still present, albeit quite a distance from shore.  A scope was needed (we had one). One Gull-billed Tern was feeding there. We stopped at Cleveland and 16th in National City but no sign of any Burrowing Parakeets.  
Phil PrydeSan Marcos