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Monthly Archives: March 2022

Broad-billed Hummingbird GONE

Broad-billed Hummingbird GONE
By – 3:15 pm
Impeccable timing. Now that we were able to set up a viewing event for the Borrego Springs Broad-billed Hummingbird, I have been informed by the homeowner that the bird appears to now have departed. It was last seen at dusk yesterday, and during its stay from 7-13 March it had become the dominant bird at the feeder, with very regular visits. Oh well!–Paul Lehman, San Diego

Borrego Broad-billed Hummingbird viewing

Borrego Broad-billed Hummingbird viewing
By – 8:48 am
A male Broad-billed Hummingbird has been coming regularly to a feeder in Borrego Springs since 7 March. The feeder is located in a GATED community, but the homeowner is incredibly generous and has agreed to let ONE manageable group in to see the bird, either Tuesday or Wednesday afternoon between 3-5 PM. Thusly, we are trying to see how many folks might potentially be interested. BUT, given the limited size of a single group, it would be best to restrict it to those folks who “need” it as a life bird or a San Diego County bird, NOT simply a year bird or other. We will probably aim for tomorrow, Tuesday, at around 3PM. If you are interested and truly need it only as a life or county bird, please contact me and we’ll see how many folks are interested. This is the honor system. And IF the bird sticks and another visit can be arranged, then it can be expanded to include other visitors.–Paul Lehman, San Diego

adult male Baltimore Oriole

adult male Baltimore Oriole
By – 7:59 am
On early Sunday morning, an adult male Baltimore Oriole is in the eucalyptus trees on the west side of the rec center building at Larsen Field, which is the park across the street from the San Ysidro outlet mall at the border. There was an adult male in these exact same trees just over 2 years ago, in December 2019, if I am remembering the exact year correctly, so this must be the same individual that has gone MIA for quite a long time.Paul Lehman, San DiegoSent from the all new AOL app for Android

Weekend Update: Coronado

Weekend Update: Coronado
By – 2:24 pm
I started the weekend at Coronado’s Tidelands Park, putting my new scope through its paces, and got incredible looks at approximately 180 surf scoters as well as several buffleheads and double-crested cormorants. The continuing cackling goose was easy to see in the pond at the Coronado Marriott, which is a just north down the coast path from Tidelands Park. Also found the continuing American redstart at Glorietta Bay Park and the continuing lesser black-backed gull on the breakwater in front of the Hotel del Coronado with Ian. Nothing new of interest to report at these locations…so we’ll keep looking!Betsy Miller VixieOlivenhain 

a word about “rec centers,” pugetensis White-crowned, singing Summer

a word about “rec centers,” pugetensis White-crowned, singing Summer

By – 9:36 am
On Saturday, 12 March, a very rare pugetensis White-crowned Sparrow continues near Montgomery Field (since Dec), and a continuing, returning adult male Summer Tanager is at Linda Vista Community Park (eucs at corner of Genesee X Osler) and which was actually in full song. Yesterday, the 11th, I had my first-of-season Western Kingbird, in Tierrasanta.A word about the use of “rec center” as locations for eBird and other reports: the term “rec center” has been used by a many folks as locations of a number of rarities and general lists (e.g., North Clairemont Rec Center, Allied Gardens Rec Center), but that term actually refers only to the physical building housing the basketball courts, gym, swimming pool, etc., NOT the actual park in which the birds reside. They are typically community parks, such as Allied Gardens Community Park, North Clairemont Community Park, etc. Now, this is not the end of the world to have used the rec center misnomer, as then the location is at least reasonably correct. But, it would seemingly be preferable to use the name of the park rather than that of just a building.–Paul Lehman, San Diego

Rufous Hummingbird Dulzura 3-8-2022

Rufous Hummingbird Dulzura 3-8-2022
By – 10:15 am
I got my hummingbird feeders back out this weekend. This morning I had my first male Rufous Hummingbird. Also as a side note, Turkey Vultures are moving through the foothills now. This morning I saw a kettle of 13 before they moved off to the northwest. I got a little excited when I picked out 4 buteo type hawks among them . Oddly all were Red-tailed Hawks. Maybe the local birds joining in, or also in movement north?Dave PoveyDulzura

spring morning-flight in March, miscellanea

spring morning-flight in March, miscellanea
By – 9:30 am
On Tuesday early morning, given the light N wind, I thought I’d spend 90 minutes on Mount Soledad in La Jolla to see what an early March morning-flight might be like. The result: ONE migrant. At least it was a mildly interesting high-flying northbound Cassin’s Kingbird, which establishes a baseline “early arrival date” for a true migrant of that species. In much of the county, determining the status of any migrant Cassin’s Kingbird is virtually impossible due to the presence of many permanent resident birds. Certainly the most reliable time to witness a good morning flight there in general is between around the second week of April and the third week of May. In any case, it is all VERY weather dependent, as you really want there to be overnight and/or dawn wind flow from between and SE and N, with between E and NE being the best. As usual, there is a cooperative flock of Golden-crowned Sparrows in the summit area of Mount Soledad.Yesterday, the cooperative, returning, wintering Hammond’s Flycatcher at Liberty Station continued, and there was a new Western Tanager in eastern Point Loma, bringing the county winter’s total to a healthy 69 individuals.–Paul Lehman, San Diego

Re: Question about Burrowing Parakeets

Re: Question about Burrowing Parakeets
By – 9:39 am
Nick, I think it’s important to make a distinction– these birds are VERY ebirdable, and I think it’s important that we do ebird them. However, they are not countable for ABA purposes, if you’re into that kind of thing. Counting them and recording observations will allow folks at the California Bird Records Committee to determine when these introduced species are ready to be added as established birds. At least, that’s how I see it. It looks like people can also report the birds directly to the committee on their website. 

Question about Burrowing Parakeets

Question about Burrowing Parakeets
By – 8:57 am
The Burrowing Parakeets seen over south San Diego are not established, at least not yet. But, they are seemingly trying to build nests, which is something to keep an eye on. Although these are not eBird-able birds, is there a better way people can report on their nesting endeavors? FYI, there are four parakeets at the dead Cleveland Ave. palm in National City at 9am Mar 7. Seen excavating material as they have been.– Nick ThorpeUniversity Heights

Lake Hodges+ 3/6/2022

Lake Hodges+ 3/6/2022
By – 3:18 pm
Highlights from a lovely morning in the Lake Hodges/Escondido area included Cactus Wrens bringing nesting materials to an existing nest structure along the NE side of Lake Hodges on a bird walk led by Peter Thomas, and great looks at the continuing Brown Creeper at Kit Carson Park. 
A slow drive with a few stops down Old Milky Way produced exactly two Common Ravens, and the same behavior at the small private pond on the corner of Del Dios and Camino del Norte returned a Gadwall pair, a Northern Shoveler pair, three Bufflehead, and a large turtle. Repeated at OMWD’s San Dieguito Reservior, I saw a lot of backlit swallows and realized the answer is to come back with my scope in better lighting conditions. Crest Drive Grace’s Warbler: 3; Betsy: 0.Betsy Miller VixieOlivenhain