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Monthly Archives: March 2022

Flycatcher ID Help please

Flycatcher ID Help please
By – 2:22 pm
Spent a couple of hours in Rancho Cuyamaca, Stonewall Mine area, and photographed a flycatcher I believe is a Western Pewee, but am not absolutely sure due to wide & strong (rather than ‘ narrow & dull’  ) wingbars.Photos at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/147991031@N08/Thanks in advance for  your help!Catherine– Live in beauty….CatherineCompetitive Obedience Toolbox: www.gettoready.nethttps://www.flickr.com/photos/147991031@N08/
OTCH Sporting Fields Summer Solstice, UDX 9, OGM (“Dax”, as in “Dax of the Long Tongue” aka ‘Sir Lickalot’))GCH OTCH6 Sporting Field’s Quantum Leap UDX 8, OGM  (‘Devon’  aka “Monkey”)   Ch. Shorewind Spellbound’s Dragon Rider , UD (“Echo”, aka  “Speed Bump”)Sporting Field’s Royal Prerogative,CD (“Little Liam”–aka, “Peewee”)
Ch. OTCH Trumagik Step Aside, UDX 20, OGM   (2002 – 2015)Ch Borderfame Soul Train, UDX, OM 3  (2006-2018)
 

Swainson’s Hawks in Borrego Springs This Evening

Swainson’s Hawks in Borrego Springs This Evening

By – 7:41 pm
At 6:30-7pm we had at least 150 and probably up to 250 Swainson’s Hawks descend into the date farm on Borrego Valley Rd. With only light wind in the morning the hawks probably will go to ground early near Borrego Valley Rd and depart the valley around 9am or later. If flying ants are available, the hawks will aerial feed before departure. Best viewing from Borrego Valley Rd or DiGiorgio Rd about 1.5 miles north of Palm Canyon Drive. The official count site is located 2.8 miles north of Palm Canyon Rd. Hal CohenBorrego Springs

determining “stealth migrants” (Mount Soledad)

determining “stealth migrants” (Mount Soledad)

By – 5:06 pm
As mentioned in some previous posts, it is not easy to document true through-migrants of a number of species in most parts of the county due to their being “drowned out” by more resident birds present as well. Often determining migration status is easier for many species at desert sites where they occur (in numbers) only as migrants. Along the coastal slope it is even more difficult. But coastal sites with distinct morning-flights, or a few small areas where many such species do not breed or winter such as outer Point Loma, may do the trick. This morning at Mount Soledad, an American Kestrel flew at moderate height from well to the south in direct flight to well to the north, over the mountain, as did the second Osprey in as many days. And as did 2 American Robins. More typical migrants today included a somewhat early Ash-throated Flycatcher and direct-flying 12 Western Kingbirds, 49 Yellow-rumped Warblers, 1 Bullock’s Oriole, and 8 Lawrence’s Goldfinches. The weather now should NOT be as good for morning-flight until at least sometime mid- next week or later.–Paul Lehman & Jay Desgrosellier, San Diego

Mission Bay Cackling Goose subspecies, Mount Soledad morning flight

Mission Bay Cackling Goose subspecies, Mount Soledad morning flight
By – 10:01 am
The Cackling Goose that has been present along the eastern shore of Mission Bay for a few weeks, and now associating with the two long-staying Greater White-fronteds, is an interesting bird. Its body size is at the large and pudgey end of the Cackling spectrum, although the head and bill look like a typical Cackling. It lacks a dark throat stripe and also lacks a white ring at the base of the neck. The latter character is something typically shown by Aleutian Cacklings, our dominant subspecies in southern California, although some young birds can lack that ring (although typically only in fall and early winter?). Anyway, some folks have suggested that this bird may be of the northwestern subspecies of Cackling–taverneri (Taverner’s)–which is thought to be very rare in southern California, at best. Still being discussed. Lots of photos of this bird may be viewed in numerous eBird reports.This morning, 22 March, a morning-flight check at Mount Soledad produced perhaps the first obvious flight of the season. And while numbers of clear through-migrants were obviously not overwhelming, they do give a clue as to what species are moving now in latter March, and in what relative numbers:1 Osprey16 Western Kingbirds4 Warbling Vireos1 Tree Swallow1 Cliff Swallow1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4 Orange-crowned Warblers36 Yellow-rumped Warblers1 Black-throated Gray Warbler4 Lawrence’s GoldfinchesAnd in the past week, I’ve had a couple more presumed wintering Bl.-thr. Gray Warblers in Mission Valley–a regular winter spot for that species–which brings the Dec-Mar county total to about 43 individuals, a new winter record!–Paul Lehman, San Diego

Crow and Coral Tree

Crow and Coral Tree
By – 1:47 pm
Our neighbor’s coral tree is at eye level from one of our windows. A few days ago I watched a crow working its way down the blooms and sipping nectar – I think – from each one. Our local crows appreciate our loquats, but the nectar sipping surprised me. Is this usual?Sally M. GallLa Jolla

Two Lewis’s Woodpecker, Los Peñasquitos

Two Lewis’s Woodpecker, Los Peñasquitos

By – 12:13 pm
I stopped mid-morning at the Los Peñaquitos Ranch House to look for the wintering Lewis’s Woodpecker and was surprised to find two birds there. One seemed to hang out in the usual sycamore tree over the metal corral west of the ranch house. I initially saw the second bird when the first chased it out of the sycamore, then I refound it in the open area to the west where it was perched on a dead branch until crows chased it off. Later it showed up near the sycamore again and was promptly chased off by the Lewis’s, some crows, and an Acorn Woodpecker. eBird List: https://ebird.org/checklist/S105238172Nick BarberSan Diego

El Cajon Parrot Roost–Pffft! Oystercatcher rituals 95mm Swarovski Spotting Scope for sale

El Cajon Parrot Roost–Pffft! Oystercatcher rituals 95mm Swarovski Spotting Scope for sale
By – 6:37 am
1. I took Stefani to the courthouse in El Cajon to watch for parrots tonight. At 6:35, 13 flew into the trees next to the parking garage. They stayed for 3 minutes then flew off to the west somewhere. Another 30-35 parrots flew in before it was too dark, and they all flew over the courthouse roost. 10 days ago, I saw maybe 250 or so at the same spot.2. Yesterday several of us observed a pair of black oystercatchers on Goldfish Point engaging in their pair-bonding thigmotactic ritual. The next stage, if they’re going to nest, should be piping, then some dancing and finally copulation. I’ll try to keep my eyes open for that series of rituals, because if they do do all of them, then it pays to go to the trouble of getting in a kayak and exploring those areas of the Cove you cannot see from land that are the best areas for oystercatchers to build a nest in.3. My new Swarovski 115mm modular objective is finally going to arrive this coming week. I will be selling my 3-year-old 95mm Swarovski objective [if you already have a Swarovski modular eyepiece] or both objective and eyepiece if you need an entire scope. Used Swarovski scopes are extremely hard to find. This one is in like-new condition and I’m looking to sell it for 1/3+ off list price. Contact me off-list if you are interested.Stanley Walens, San DiegoMarch 19, 2022; 7:45 pm

Hooded Mergansers Poway Creek, and spring migrants

Hooded Mergansers Poway Creek, and spring migrants
By – 7:03 pm
Went birding along Poway Creek through very late morning and into theafternoon. It was very birdy, despite the time of day. Found a couple offemale Hooded Mergansers in the creek. They were just west of the bridgethat goes between Soule Street and Poway Community Park. I never wouldhave seen them if one of them hadn’t swum out from against the reedsjust as I happened to look down there. She quickly went back by thesouth side reeds, and while I was taking a few photos of her I saw thesecond one. There was a pair of Cinnamon Teal in the same spot.Also had what I assume was a migrating Wilson’s Warbler down near PowayCity Hall. I haven’t seen any Wilson’s anywhere around Sabre Springs orPoway all winter, hence my possibly incorrect assumption that it wasn’taround all winter. Finally found a couple of Tipus among the manypristine ones in that area that seem to have some lerps. The Wilson’sflew out of one of those trees and I had an Orange-crowned, twoTownsend’s, and two Yellow-rumped’s in that same tree. The trees arepretty close to the creek and are up against the east side of a smallbuilding that is just east of the larger Poway City Hall building.Had my FOS Pacific-slope Flycatcher by the creek in Sabre Springs thispast Wednesday. Hooded Orioles are later than they used to be coming tothis area. They were last year too. None in the yard yet, but had one bythe creek and one by Creekside Elementary School on Wednesday, and oneflying through the residential area on the north side of Poway Creektoday. I know others have been seeing them around the county for thelast few weeks.Lisa RubySabre Springs– Lisa RubySabre Springs

Snipe

Snipe
By – 10:02 pm
In case anyone was wondering if they’re still there, at least one Snipe was seen this morning (Thurs.) in the same San Dieguito location by a small group of acquaintances (I wasn’t with them).  
Phil PrydeSan carlos

continuing Black-throated Green, Black-and-white, and Summer

continuing Black-throated Green, Black-and-white, and Summer
By – 8:59 am
Tuesday morning, the wintering Black-throated Green Warbler at the San Diego Mission continues, showing up at its usual eucalyptus and pepper trees next to the curve in the driveway behind the mission at around 7:50 a.m. In contrast, the wintering bird at Allied Gardens hasn’t been reported in at least a month. The Serra Mesa Black- and-white Warbler also continues, as does the female Summer Tanager at Berry Park along Leon Avenue, present since December. A Black-throated Gray Warbler today in Mission Valley likely wintered locally.Paul Lehman, San DiegoSent from the all new AOL app for Android