Join/Renew (2022 Dues)

Monthly Archives: January 2022

offshore San Diego Friday: Red-footed Booby, etc.

offshore San Diego Friday: Red-footed Booby, etc.
By – 5:12 pm
On Friday, 21 Jan, several folks ventured offshore to the 9-Mile Bank area. The highlight of the trip was a dark, immature Red-footed Booby with Brown Boobies some 11.7 miles W of the tip of Point Loma. This is the first record of a non-rehabbed Red-footed Booby in San Diego County waters between early January and April.  Other highlights included single Pink-footed and Sooty Shearwaters, scarce at this time of year, a “Thayer’s” Iceland Gull, 10 Brown Boobies, and–most unusual well offshore beyond just a couple miles out–a flock of 13 Forster’s Terns (with Bonapartes’s Gulls) some 12.4 miles off Point Loma. Other misc. totals for the trip included 14 Northern Fulmars, 40 Scripps’s Murrelets, 15 Cassin’s Auklets, 21 Rhinoceros Auklets, and 1 Parasitic & 2 Pomarine Jaegers.For those interested in the dates of the scheduled pelagic trips off San Diego in 2022, the dates and prices are being finalized right now and should be available by 1 Feb or very soon thereafter. See sandiegopelagics.com for further details at that time. Be aware that there will indeed be trips offered in all the same months as we did in 2021, with an additional trip in July, plus two somewhat shorter trips offered, probably in April and October.–Paul Lehman, San Diego

Baltimore Oriole at Zoo parking

Baltimore Oriole at Zoo parking
By – 8:53 am
Thursday morning, there’s a female Baltimore Oriole at the San Diego Zoo parking lot in the line of scattered blooming coral trees that line the edge of the lot right along the front edge of the zoo itself. The bird appeared a little before 8:00 a.m. and was still present at 8:15 when I departed, starting near the north end of the row and working south and was last in the middle section of those scattered coral trees. Be aware that there is also a dull female Bullock’s Oriole present, as well as at least a couple Western tanagers. The Bullock’s appeared already just after 7:00 a.m. but the Baltimore not for another half hour or 45 minutes after that. I will post photos of the Baltimore on an eBird list later today so you can see what the bird looks like, as a fair number of observers don’t appreciate what some of these female Baltimores look like and may call them Bullock’s. The female Bullock’s that is there is very dull, with just a light yellow wash on the head and breast and a pretty distinct complete dark eyeline and dull yellow supercilium. The Baltimore is clearly quite a bit orangier, especially the breast, and has a blanker looking front section of the face. There’s a very good chance this is a returning bird, as I had a similar one there last year and even perhaps the year before that.I am currently in the process of missing the Eastern Phoebe at Morley Field.Paul Lehman, San DiegoSent from the all new AOL app for Android

La Jolla Cove 1/19/22: FYI

La Jolla Cove 1/19/22: FYI
By – 1:17 pm
No rare birds. Still about 2000 black-vented shearwaters around. For the past 10 days, Pacific loons have been streaming south past La Jolla. Rates vary from 100-200/hour. The new bathrooms are set to open this weekend after 3 years of construction. No more portapotties!Parking on weekends has been atrocious after about 9:00. Stan Walens, San DiegoJan 19, 2022; 1:00 pm

another Hepatic Tanager, Plumbeous, Nashvilles, Lark Sparrow glut

another Hepatic Tanager, Plumbeous, Nashvilles, Lark Sparrow glut
By – 11:49 am
On Weds the 19th, an adult male Hepatic Tanager has returned for at least its fourth winter to private property in Tierrasanta. I see it each year only quite sporadically. Photo’d. At nearby Serra Mesa, a returning Plumbeous Vireo and yet another Nashville Warbler are in a tipu neighborhood. This is the third new Nashville I’ve seen in just the past week scattered around the county, all in tipus. And bordering Montgomery Field there is a flock of 24 Lark Sparrows, certainly the largest flock I’ve ever seen near the coast, although I gather there is also a similar-sized concentration this winter in Santee and possibly at Allied Gardens. A continuing male Vermilion Flycatcher and 3 Barn Swallows at Admiral Baker Golf Course. Yesterday, a new Black-thr Gray Warbler in sw. La Mesa.–Paul Lehman, San Diego

13 Black Oystercatchers and the hybrid in La Jolla this morning

13 Black Oystercatchers and the hybrid in La Jolla this morning
By – 8:40 pm
Ter Hurst and I were at the La Jolla seawatch area for a while thismorning, and on the rocks below Stan’s bench during high tide there were13 Black Oystercatchers all snoozing together, plus the Black x Americanhybrid. Paul had posted on Dec 31 that he had a high count of 10.Scanning through the numbers for that area in eBird it appears that theall time reported high count before today was 11 reported by JimPawlicki yesterday.Lisa RubySabre Springs– Lisa RubySabre Springs

Re: some rarity stakeout updates, minor newbies

Re: some rarity stakeout updates, minor newbies
By – 2:18 pm
The stint was not present at the end of 10th late morning today but there to console us was an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull bathing in the Otay channel and later roosting on stint island. Seen with Copper and Patton along with Swain, Leibowitz, and Spencer over on the bike path.Matt Sadowski

some rarity stakeout updates, minor newbies

some rarity stakeout updates, minor newbies
By – 2:06 pm
First, some relatively minor new birds: A Nashville Warbler was in a University City tipu parking lot on 15 Jan. A Western Tanager was in North Park on 16 Jan. And a Black-thr Gray Warbler was in Solana Beach on 17 Jan. Robert Patton found a new Pacific-slope Flycatcher today, the 17th, in the northeast corner of Lemon Grove Park.Some hopefully helpful tidbits on several of the better continuing rarities:Little Stint: on the 16th we starting looking for it a little before 9AM and it did not appear until 10:20 AM on the island, near/at “the elbow.” Only three peep present on the island: the stint, 1 Western, 1 Least. Several Glaucous-winged Gulls in the area.Scissor-tailed Flycatcher: this morning, the 17th, the Fairbanks Ranch/Del Mar/RSF bird appeared at the fence around the square pond at 7AM. Cassin’s Kingbirds started filtering in at 6:45AM from their nearby roost site in eucalyptus trees, but the STFL took a bit longer to show, but was then around for about 45 minutes, mostly on the fence, but also a bit in nearby eucs and power lines. A total of about 10+ Cassin’s are also present. When the STFL departed it flew well to the WEST with a couple Cassin’s, toward the main soccer fields. Don’t know how much this early AM routine might have been affected by today’s overcast and borderline damp conditions, versus if it were sunny. But clearly, this bird is gettable early in the day, as well as late. And if the gate is locked at the entrance to the Surf Sports Fields (it was opened today at 6:45), then one could park outside and climb through the wooded fencing there just so you would walk in literally 30 feet so you could see the entire pond area. Would hope that that level of transgression is permissable, but no guarantees.Greater Pewee: yesterday morning the Balboa Park bird appeared shortly after 8AM in the tall eucalyptus bordering the parking lot on the south side of the Organ Pavillion, but fairly quickly it flew over the International Cottages into sweet gums and eucalyptus bordering the Palm Canyon side of the Cottages.Black-throated Green Warbler: yesterday at Allied Gardens Comm. Park it still frequents the several tipu trees at the west end of the park, but it will be elsewhere in ficus etc., where difficult to find, for appreciable lengths of time as well. So patience is the name of the game and just wait by the tipus!–Paul Lehman, San Diego

Re: Red-necked Grebe off Bayview Park, Coronado 1/13

Re: Red-necked Grebe off Bayview Park, Coronado 1/13
By – 7:30 am
On a bike ride around the island yesterday, I looked for the Red-necked Grebe (1/16, Sunday) at 1000, but did not find it. I scanned from Bayview Park, the water was calm and flat and it was birdy in this corner of the bay. Lots of Surf Scoters and Buffleheads, cormorants and a Red-breasted Merganser (that caught a big fish), and a few Eared Grebes too, but no RNGR. After that I scanned from the ferry landing pier just a little farther south, but very few birds on the water there. It was high tide, a falling tide.At the Hotel Del I also did not find the Lesser Black-backed Gull, but I believe it is better to look at low tide.CharlesSan DiegoSent from CJ’s iPhone📲