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Monthly Archives: May 2020

Dusky Flycatcher – Lagunas

Tuck Russell and I walked Desert View Road in the Lagunas this morning (Tuesday 5/12). We were able to locate at least two, possibly three Dusky Flycatchers in this area, a known breeding location. Unlike other trips I have made up there in past years, the flycatchers were essentially silent, which made them very hard to find. Finally I heard one making repeated whit calls and after several minutes of scanning we were able to get eyes on. We found another one up the road more than ¼ mile and presume it was a different bird.

 

We encountered a small group of warblers foraging along the road – Wilson, Hermit, Townsends and Black-throated Gray.

 

We also had several Cassin’s Vireos singing in the area, another bird that nests along the road. One of the vireos seemed really pale to me, and after looking at my photos I am not certain that it is a Cassins, but possibly a Plumbeous. It has only the faintest hint of buffy coloration in the vent area, none along the flanks, and the back is gray, not olive as a Cassins usually is. I put the photos in my checklist under Cassins Vireo for now.

 

Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S68938997

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 

Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

Cardiff Elegant Tern

as a follow up to Sue Smiths note about the terns at Penesquitos i was down at the mouth of the San Elijo Lagoon this morning at 7 and wildly guessed 1751 Elegant Terns,  likely lots more. Lots of gulls too mostly cal gulls What made it quite the experience was the tide was quite low and you could walk far  out on  to the sand bars to where the birds were and get very close, I included some photos in my ebird report that kinda show the experience minus the raucousness of the flock. 
The flock was nearly all elegant as i only spotted one royal tern and one forsters tern.  Ive been going to the beach for a number of decades now and have never seen a dead Garabaldi on the beach. Today we saw 12, bad for the fish, good for the gulls. If you think you might want to see the spectacle parking is an issue,  You will likely need to park in the Cardiff residential area and walk a couple blocks down the beach
my ebird report with photos
https://ebird.org/checklist/S68862351

stay safe
steve brad
leucadia
Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

Re: American Bittern San Elijo Lagoon

I went back to San Elijo Lagoon Sunday evening (5/10) between 6 and 7pm, and again heard the American Bittern calling in the same place I reported it on April 6 (in the marsh just north of the La Orilla Trail as it climbs the hill west of the Santa Helena Trail, near the location where a break in the lemonade berry bushes gives a clear view of the marsh). Again it was in tall bulrushes, so I couldn't see it, but it was very close by. Unless it has favorite morning and evening displaying locations, the location seems far enough from the location Steve reported that there may be more than one individual. I will have to try the Stonebridge trail in hopes of seeing the display.
Jim

Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

Re: Mystery Warbler (photos provided) in Carmel Valley

Thanks to everyone that responded! I’ve received suggestions of both Mourning and MacGillivray’s. The images I’ve researched look more like Mourning, but location and rarity definitely lean towards MacGillivray’s.  I’ll keep researching and if I get an expert to look at them and provide a positive ID, I’ll let you know. 

If anyone would like me to send the full-res images directly via email so you can zoom/pan, please let me know. Apparently, eBird does not allow you to zoom in on the images.
Lastly, since I was biking/birding for over 7 hours around Carmel Valley, Sorrento Valley, and west Peñasquitos Canyon / Lagoon, my checklist was flagged for “Distance too long”. Although my odometer stated 28 miles covered, I didn’t travel that far from home (as a crow flies), trying to keep in the spirit of a “COVID Challenge” Big Day. I guess I should have created over a dozen little mini-checklists, with specific locations and durations and distances, but I didn’t. 
So, my checklist (https://ebird.org/checklist/S68776286) is in this state: "Distance too long. This checklist has been flagged by a reviewer for covering a large distance. Specific locations and shorter distances are required for public display: this checklist and its observations do not appear in public eBird outputs."
I’m curious if anyone else did a Global Big Day on May 9 and if your checklist was later flagged, or how you handled an all-day birding excursion where you covered a 5-mile radius count circle.
Sincerely,
David Trissel
San Diego, CA

Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

Large aggregation of Terns and other birds at Penasquitos Lagoon, 10 May

    From about 2:30-3:00 pm on the subject date, I noted a very large aggregation of terns, herons, egrets, pelicans, gulls,  cormorants feeding inside Penasquitos Lagoon, in Del Mar. I could not make a good count because I could not access much of the area, and had limited time, and my eBird counts are likely way under. 

     These large aggregations have been noted in other areas in the county, the birds evidently are being drawn to the abundance of dead and dying fish that are succumbing because of depleted oxygen conditions in lagoon waters caused by the bacterial breakdown of masses of the dying dinoflagellate, L. polyedra–the cause of our long-continuing red tide.  But this is the first time I noted it in Penasquitos Lagoon, which has not been noted for its tern numbers in recent years. 
Susan Smith 

Seiurus Biological  Consulting 
Del Mar, CA 
seiurus@…


Susan Smith
Seiurus Biological Consulting
Del Mar, CA
Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

Brown-crested Flycatcher near Scissors Crossing

Russ and I made a trip to a few birding spots on the desert this morning. We found a pair of Brown-crested Flycatchers north of Scissor Crossing in the first big clump of cottonwood trees. We had visited the spot in Sentac Canyon (by the welcome to Anza-Borrego sign) where there have been BC Flycatchers recently, and while I thought I heard the BCFL call  right as we got out of the car, we never heard them again while we walked around.

 

Saw at least 5 Scott’s Orioles this morning. The males are up and singing.

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 

Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

American Bittern San Elijo Lagoon

the recently reported  american bittern was in full throat this Morning Sunday.  Seen and heard west of the mesa and also  on the south side of the mesa and about 100 yards west of the Stonebridge Trail
Fun to see the guy puff out  his big chest
some  grainy photos in my ebird report
https://ebird.org/checklist/S68799179

stay safe
steve brad 
leucadia
Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

Mystery Warbler (photos provided) in Carmel Valley

Did my biking birding Global Big Day today (May 9) in the Carmel Valley, Sorrento Valley, Peñasquitos Canyon area. At 6:00 PM I was taking a happy hour/dinner break and saw this bird on my street. I didn’t have my binocs with me at the moment (Murphy’s Law), only my cellphone, so I took three pretty bad pictures but they show the feature I want to ask about. This bird looked like an Orange-crowned Warbler except for the black throat patch. If anyone has an idea as to what this bird is, please let me know. Checklist with photos:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S68776286
Sincerely,
David Trissel
San Diego, CA

Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports

the Twin Trails parrot

The bird being reported as a Red-lored Parrot in eBird is problematic, given the large amount of red bleeding into the cheeks. I've contacted all observers to date, but to head off future misidentifications, I figured I'd write a note. A few people with more urban Amazona experience than I have suggested it's likely a Red-lored x Red-crowned/Lilac-crowned Parrot, a hybrid, but probably best just entered as Amazona sp.  

Many of these species are reproductively isolated in their native ranges (and sadly in decline), but through introductions into our area, they are now coming into contact and hybridizing with some regularity. In this case, the behavior suggests recent escape/release and likely a bird bred in captivity – another source of odd hybrids and plumage irregularities.

Flipping through the photos on eBird below, one should see how the red is restricted to the lores in a Red-lored Parrot, hence the name.


Justyn Stahl
North Park

Source: SanDiegoRegionBirding Latest Reports